Current Students

Field Station: Kianjavato

Yvan

Yvan

PhD Candidate
University of Antananarivo

Bamboo and litchis propagation and impact of the basket making in Kianjavato, Madagascar.
This project establishes bamboo stands where people can sustainably harvest for their construction and artisanal needs (basket-making), reducing pressure on bamboo patches in the forest upon which greater bamboo lemurs rely.

Daniel

Daniel

PhD Candidate
University of Antananarivo

Kianjavato, in southeastern Madagascar, is classified as one of the 30 priority sites for primate conservation. Kianjavato is also a key area for lemur conservation and is a part of the Corridor Fandriana-Vohidrozo (CoFaV). We are using mycorrhiza to improve restoration success of forest species in the Kianjavato forest.

Faranky

Faranky

PhD Candidate
University of Antananarivo

The aye-aye is a solitary nocturnal lemur identified as one of the top 25 most endangered primates in the world. We are studying the social interaction of mother-baby and between adult individuals of this cryptic species to understand his social life and to be able to develop appropriate conservation efforts.

Ando

Ando

PhD Candidate
University of Mahajanga

Building a sustainable future for the Critically Endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur (Prolemur simus) in Kianjavato, Madagascar.
This research project examines how to build a sustainable future for greater bamboo lemurs living in Vatovavy forest, Kianjavato, Madagascar. To achieve our goals, we habituated first the species, then recorded their behaviors particularly their feeding behavior, the nutritional value of the plants they consumed, and their habitat structure.

Field Station: Lavavolo

Andrée

Nambinina

PhD Candidate
University of Toliara

Population, ecological requirements and local extinction risk of radiated tortoises in Southwest Madagascar.
Our aim is to determine the population density in the three habitats (dry forest on sandy soil, dry forest on ferruginous soil, calcaerous plateau) of the radiated tortoise and to know the diet and behavior of the species in the natural population. We also identified pressures and threats, as well as their effects on the radiated tortoise population.

Sylvain

Sylvain

PhD Candidate
University of Toliara

Using the ring-tailed lemur population in the Mahafaly Plateau as a tool for the safeguard of the remaining population in their natural habitats and the
biodiversity of the region.

This study identifies the ring-tailed lemur population, their adaptive
lifestyles subject to the influence of various ecological factors, and
the pressures and threats caused by humans by highlighting the population dynamics of the species in a sub-arid bioclimate.

Field Station: Torotorofotsy

Jeannin Nicolas

Jeannin Nicolas

PhD Candidate
University of Mahajanga

Aye-ayes are a top 25 endangered primate that have had limited behavioral research conducted on them. This is largely due to their nocturnal and cryptic nature, making them difficult to study. This research will create a baseline for understanding the ecological requirements of an adult female when she is rearing an infant. Additionally, it will elucidate information on the behavioral development of wild aye-aye young and estimate the interbirth interval of aye-ayes, which can be compared against aye-ayes from other forests. All of this information is critical for guiding conservation initiatives of the species.

Field Station: Montagne des Français

Aubin

Aubin

PhD Candidate
University of Mahajanga

Dynamic study of the forest species and effects of the composting in the reforestation program at Montagne des Français
The object of this work is to improve the reforestation program in Montages des Français and increase the quality of the compost to grow the seedlings in the nursery. This will help the survival of the trees planted in the different forest fragments we are restoring.

September Volunteers

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Meet our September Volunteers Shannon CANADA I’m Shannon from Ontario, Canada. I have an Undergrad Degree in Environmental Science and took a Post Graduate program in Ecosystem Restoration. For work, I have performed shoreline evaluations and provided restoration techniques for landowners. I have also worked with an at risk turtle species in Ontario and sea turtles in Costa Rica. Currently I am a coastal specialist and planning and regulations assistant at a conservation authority in … Read More

Meet Our New Volunteer, Andreas!

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Hi, my name is Andreas and I come from Denmark. In august 2021 I graduated my education as Animal Keeper, specializing in animals in zoos. I have been working 3 years in a Danish zoo with a great variety of species and there I got a special interest in lemurs. After having graduated I then did a 6-month Erasmus Pro internship in a zoo in The Netherlands. There I spent a lot of my time … Read More

Welcome New Volunteer!

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My name is Julianne and I’m from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. I fell in love with lemurs and primatology as an Education Intern at the Philadelphia Zoo. After my internship, I switched my major to Anthropology and started looking into field schools in Madagascar. Less than a year later, I took my first trip to Madagascar where I studied diademed sifakas in Tsinjoarivo. I met so many amazing people whose work really inspired me to … Read More

MBP Introduces Circular Conservation

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You may have heard of a circular economy, now let us introduce our concept of circular conservation. In 2021, we inaugurated three new interconnected programs at the Ihofa Vohitsara Bioreserve and Field Station near Torotorofotsy, Madagascar, that reinforce forest integrity. This area has dark green expanses of intact evergreen forest abutting mining concessions, tourist venues, villages, and agriculture. All this human activity sometimes spills over its legal boundaries, reducing habitat availability and increasing bushmeat pressure. … Read More

News Article 2020B-035

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Sometimes weathering the storm is not good enough; learning to thrive despite the storm is necessary for many people living in Madagascar. As one of the world’s poorest nations, surmounting obstacles is a regular aspect of daily living. Covid-19 exacerbated the situation, but the underlying challenges have deep roots that long preceded the arrival of the global pandemic. After working with communities for more than 10 years, we have come to revere the steadfast commitment … Read More

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Over the past ten years we have seen the installation of numerous tent sites, an elevated walkway, two tree nurseries capable of housing 60,000 seedlings, composting bins, an open air dining hall and kitchen, a number of storage facilities, showers, toilets, two wells, multiple rainwater collection systems, a laundry station, and a parking area.

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